CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

Philippines. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by. John T. Sidel. California: Stanford University Press, xii + US$, cloth. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by John T. Sidel, Stanford: Stanford University Press, East-West Center Series on Contemporary. Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local.

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Sidel has written a superb and pioneering analysis that defines the future course for studies of local elites—not only in the Philippines but elsewhere as well. Bossism in the Philippines, by John T.

The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. The author argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the capitzl of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development. Details and ordering information at Stanford University Press.

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This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area’s coercive and economic resources. This is because bossism both relies upon and reinforces the deplorable status quo in terms of widespread poverty, inequality, landlessness, lawlessness, and other socio-economic ills. Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines.

This leads him, unfortunately, to dismiss altogether the explanatory relevance of culture — an issue I address further below. Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development.

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Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines | John T. Sidel

Kerkvliet Limited preview – Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion pjilippines shaping electoral competition and social relations. Government Asia Centre International Relations.

Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines.

Examples of bossism include Old Corruption in eighteenth-century England, urban political machines in the United States, caciques in Latin America, the Mafia in Southern Italy, and today’s gangster politicians in such countries as India, Russia, and Thailand. The predatory nature of the Philippine state, according to Sidel, has its roots in American colonial efforts at nation-building in the early twentieth century.

Similarly, in early postindependence Indonesia, [ Capital, Coercion, and Crime: However, with the demise of parliamentary rule and the onset of martial law inand the inception of military rule ina centralized bureaucratic state emerged to subordinate local aristocracies, magnates, and gangsters alike [ Other editions – View all Capital, Coercion, and Crime: In sum, Capital, Coercion, and Crime provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to scholars of Southeast Asia but coercjon students of comparative politics as well.

The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. It provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to crim of Southeast Asia but to students of comparative politics as well. It is painfully obvious that bossism is highly damaging to Philippine society as a whole, at the very least because it corrupts electoral coerion and hobbles the development of a truly representative democracy.

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The small-town dynasties of Cebu– 5. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations.

Of course, whether or not any election is legitimate or truly democratic is debatable. Bossism in the Philippines.

The SmallTown Dynasties of Cebu. Nielsen Book Data Publisher’s Summary This text focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area s coercive and economic resources.

The comparative examples presented in the final chapter do not conclusively reinforce his assertions, nor do they show that an alternative institutional apparatus or sequence of political and economic developments would have prevented the emergence of bosses.

Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines

This vapital, in turn, ensures that the Philippines will never rise above this post-colonial mire for as long as bossism remains entrenched. Nielsen Book Data A reader might infer from such statements that centralized authoritarian rule, by the military or by traditional elites, is the antidote to bossism, and that it is preferable to an phili;pines democracy in which citizens might be coerced or duped into electing the wrong people.

Everyday Politics in the Philippines: Knowing this, it becomes entirely conceivable that some bosses remain in power simply because they are legitimately re-elected.

Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development.

Secret Trades, Porous Borders: Class and Status Relations in a The DistrictLevel Dynasties of Cebu.